Glossary of Traffic Safety Terms

AA

AA is the Administrative Adjudication system.  Maintained by the NYS Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV), traffic tickets issued in New York City are captured and stored in the AA traffic ticket data system.  Traffic tickets issued in the city of Rochester prior to April 21, 2018, are also stored in the AA system, as well as tickets issued in the city of Buffalo prior to July 2015 and tickets issued in parts of Suffolk County prior to April 2013.  The AA ticket system is also known as the Traffic Violations Bureau (TVB) system.

Acquitted

Acquitted is the term used to indicate that the person issued the ticket has been found not guilty by the system.

Adjudication Status

Adjudication Status is the term used to reflect whether a ticket has been adjudicated through the system or is still pending adjudication.

Alcohol-related crash

An alcohol-related crash is a crash that has at least one of these factors:  (1) “Alcohol Involvement” was reported as a contributing factor on the police accident report, (2) a ticket was issued for alcohol-impaired driving, or (3) a positive BAC was reported.

Bicycle crash

A bicycle crash is a motor vehicle crash in which a bicycle was involved.  New York’s Vehicle & Traffic Law (VAT) defines a bicycle as “every two or three wheeled device upon which a person or persons may ride, propelled by human power through a belt, a chain or gears, with such wheels in a tandem or tricycle, except that it shall not include such a device having solid tires and intended for use only on a sidewalk by pre-teenage children.”

Conviction

Conviction is the term used to indicate that the person issued the ticket has been found guilty of violating the law.

Dismissed

Dismissed is the term used to indicate that the ticket is not considered valid by the system and thus has been dismissed.

Driver

The term Driver refers to an operator of any motor vehicle including a motorcycle; it does not include bicyclists.

Drug-related crash

A drug-related crash is a crash that has at least one of these factors:  (1) “Drugs (Illegal)” or “Prescription Medication” was reported as a contributing factor on the police accident report, (2) a ticket was issued for a drug-impaired driving violation, or (3) an individual had a positive drug test result.

Fatal crash

A fatal crash is a motor vehicle crash in which at least one person was killed.  One fatal crash may involve more than one vehicle and more than one fatality.

Fatality

A fatality is a person killed in a motor vehicle crash, within 30 days of the crash.

Impaired crash

An impaired crash is a crash that has at least one of these factors:

  1. “Alcohol Involvement,” “Drugs (Illegal)” or “Prescription Medication” was reported as a contributing factor on the police crash report
  2. A ticket was issued for an alcohol-impaired or drug-impaired driving violation
  3. A positive BAC was reported
  4. An individual had a positive drug test result

KABCO Scale

The KABCO scale for crash severity defines levels of injury severity. If several people are injured in a crash, the most severe injury level is used to set crash severity.

  • “K” Fatal injuries include deaths which occur within thirty days following injury in a motor vehicle crash.
  • “A” Severe injuries include skull fractures, internal injuries, broken or distorted limbs, unconsciousness, severe lacerations, severe burns, and unable to leave the scene without assistance.
  • “B” Moderate injuries include visible injuries such as a “lump” on the head, abrasions, and minor lacerations.
  • “C” Minor injuries include hysteria, nausea, momentary unconsciousness, and complaint of pain without visible signs of injury.
  • “Unk Severity” Severity of injury unknown
  • “O” No fatality or injury; property damage only

Large truck crash

A large truck crash is a crash involving a vehicle with a registered weight greater than or equal to 10,000 lbs. and a truck/bus class type and vehicle body type that fall within the DMV’s large truck classification types.

Motorcycle crash

A motorcycle crash is a crash involving a motor vehicle having a seat or saddle for the use of the rider and designed to travel on not more than three wheels in contact with the ground, but excluding a tractor.

Older driver crash

An older driver crash is a crash involving a person 65 and older operating a motor vehicle.

Passing/Lane Changing/Improper Use

Passing/Lane Changing/Improper Use, a Contributing Factor in the TSSR reports, includes crashes in which the police checked “Passing/Lane,” “Passing Too Closely,” or “Unsafe Lane Changing” as apparent contributing factors on the police accident report form.

Pedestrian crash

A pedestrian crash is a motor vehicle crash involving a person afoot or in a wheelchair.  This includes people on personal conveyances such as roller skates, skateboards and scooters.

Property damage crash

A property damage crash is a crash that resulted in damage of more than $1,000 to the vehicle of one person.

Region

The state is typically divided into three regions for purposes of analysis:  Upstate, Long Island and New York City.  The Upstate region consists of the 55 counties north of New York City, the Long Island region includes the two counties of Nassau and Suffolk, and the New York City region is comprised of five counties (Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens and Richmond).

Reportable crash

A reportable crash is a motor vehicle colliding with a vehicle, person, building or other object, reported by a police officer or a motorist, in which there was a fatality, a person injured, and/or property damage to any one person in excess of $1,000.

Severity

Crash severity is based on individual injury severity.  If several people are injured in a crash, the most severe injury level is used to set crash severity. See “KABCO Scale” above.

Speed-related crash

A speed-related crash is a crash that had “Unsafe Speed” reported as a contributing factor on the police accident report and/or a ticket was issued for speeding.

Ticket

Ticket, also known as a citation, is the term used to denote a violation of the state’s Vehicle and Traffic Law (VTL), Thruway Rules and Regulations, Tax law, Transportation Law, Parks and Recreation Regulations, local NYC traffic ordinances and NYS Penal Law pertaining to the involvement of a motor vehicle in acts of assault, homicide, manslaughter and criminal negligence resulting in injury or death.  It is important to note that the vast majority of the tickets issued are for violations of the VTL.

TSLED

TSLED is the Traffic Safety Law Enforcement and Disposition system.  Maintained by the NYS Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV), TSLED is designed as a ticket accountability system, tracking traffic tickets from the time they are issued until they are adjudicated in the courts.  TSLED covers all areas of the state, with the exception of New York City.  The areas not included in TSLED are covered by the DMV’s Administrative Adjudication (AA) System; the AA traffic ticket data system is also known as the Traffic Violations Bureau (TVB) system.

Please Note:  This site is not affiliated with TSLED.  For questions about TSLED, contact the DMV: By phone at (518) 486-9786, or by email at tsledsupport@dmv.ny.gov.

TSSR

The TSSR is New York State’s Traffic Safety Statistical Repository.  Released in March 2016, the TSSR provides the public with direct access to the state’s major traffic safety data.  Users can interact with dynamic reports through SAS Visual Analytics business intelligence software.  The project was designed and implemented by the University at Albany’s Institute for Traffic Safety Management and Research (ITSMR) and funded by the Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee (GTSC).

TVB

TVB is the Traffic Violations Bureau.  Maintained by the NYS Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV), traffic tickets issued in New York City are captured and stored in the TVB traffic ticket data system; the TVB ticket system is also known as the Administrative Adjudication (AA) system.

Upstate

The state is typically divided into three regions for purposes of analysis:  Upstate, Long Island and New York City.  The Upstate region consists of the 55 counties north of New York City, the Long Island region includes the two counties of Nassau and Suffolk, and the New York City region is comprised of five counties (Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens and Richmond).

Vehicle

The term Vehicle does not include bicycles.

Young driver crash

A young driver crash is a crash involving a person 16 to 20 years old operating a motor vehicle.